< HOME  Tuesday, May 16, 2006

EU offers small carrot, US carries big stick

Of course, the EU describes the carrot in big terms, but offers no concrete parameters of exactly what's on the table.
[T]he European Union was willing to offer Iran "the most sophisticated technology" provided that it would be used for generating energy and not building nuclear weapons.

"We want to prove to the Iranians clearly and loudly that we have nothing against Iran using nuclear power for peaceful means," Mr. Solana said. "But we do not have proof that this is the case, and Iranian demands to be able to conduct enrichment for research purposes is something we can't accept."

He did NOT explain how technology could be offered that would allow Iran to produce nuclear power without also enabling it to create weapons-grade nuclear materials. Nor did he explain how such technology could be provided without approval from the United States, which insists that Iran halt all nuclear activities.

* * *

European nations said they MAY add a light-water reactor to a package of incentives meant to persuade Tehran to permanently give up enrichment, or face the threat of UN Security Council sanctions.
More importantly, though two days ago they were quoted as saying that incentives "POSSIBLY" included security guarantees, yesterday they unequivocally denied making any such offer.
European officials said they had discussed an incentives package for Iran that included proposals to speed talks on its potential admission to the World Trade Organization and on expanding university ties between Iran and Europe. However, THEY EMPHASIZED that Europe would NOT offer Iran security guarantees against potential threats by its neighbors.
Just another bogus attempt to make them look like they've made every effort to negotiate.

And Ahmedinejad did not shy away from saying so.

"Do you think you are dealing with a 4-year-old child to whom you can give some walnuts and chocolates and get gold from him?" he said.

[In stark contrast to how we respond when our president opens his mouth,] Ahmadinejad's comment prompted immediate support from the crowd. "We love you Ahmadinejad," the crowd shouted.

"They say they want to offer us incentives," Ahmadinejad told the crowd, referring to the Europeans. "We tell them: keep the incentives as a gift for yourself. We have no hope of anything good from you."

I guess that means they can take their small carrot and . . .

Meanwhile, Iranians had a little counteroffer of their own for the Europeans.

"We are prepared to offer economic incentives to Europe in return for recognizing our right (to enrich uranium)," [Foreign Ministry spokesman] Hamid Reza Asefi was quoted by state-run radio as saying.

"Iran's 70-million population market is a good incentive for Europe," the radio quoted Asefi as saying.

* * *

"We recommend that you not sacrifice your interests for the sake of others," [Ahmadinejad said] in an apparent warning to the European Union about supporting the position advocated by the United States.

"Don't force governments and nations to renounce their membership in the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty," he said asserting that [under the NPT] Iran had the right to a civilian nuclear power program.

Of course, the US will have none of that.

[T]he Americans are at the forefront of efforts to introduce a council resolution that would demand Iran give up enrichment or else face the threat of sanctions.

Washington seeks to make such a resolution militarily enforceable[.]

But, Russia and China say that THEY will have none of THAT.

In the latest sign of persisting differences, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Tuesday that Beijing and Moscow will not vote for the use of force in resolving the nuclear dispute.
But, that doesn't say much, since Russia and China can abstain from voting, leaving the US with the authority it needs to legally use force.

Nevertheless, Russia and China are moving full speed ahead with economic cooperation with Iran.

In a gesture to Tehran, Lavrov also said Ahmadinejad will attend a summit next month in Shanghai, China, of leaders from Russia, China and four Central Asian nations.

"We cannot isolate Iran or exert pressure on it," Lavrov told reporters. "Far from resolving this issue of proliferation, it will make it more urgent."
But, hey the US doesn't care if the whole world goes to hell, as long as the currency's still standing.

4 Comments:

At Wednesday, May 17, 2006, Blogger borkafatty said...

NO CONFIDENCE

http://tinyurl.com/hr5ot

 
At Wednesday, May 17, 2006, Blogger jayzerz said...

The EU is acting in concert with US, just stringing everyone along until it's supposed to look like Iran is being unreasonable and doesn't want to negotiate.

What has surprised me is that they haven't been able to pull it all off yet. The Russians and Chinese are playing a strange game with their cards so close to the chest, but the overall gameplan has been frustrated by them so far.

 
At Wednesday, May 17, 2006, Blogger qrswave said...

That's the way it seems, so far.

The stakes are very high though. The next few months are going to be very fateful.

 
At Thursday, May 18, 2006, Anonymous Anonymous said...

jayzerz said...

The EU is acting in concert with US, just stringing everyone along until it's supposed to look like Iran is being unreasonable and doesn't want to negotiate.

What has surprised me is that they haven't been able to pull it all off yet. The Russians and Chinese are playing a strange game with their cards so close to the chest, but the overall gameplan has been frustrated by them so far.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

It's good to see there are still intelligent people around. In fact, the Internet is bringing a lot of people informed of history, Zionism, the Holohaux, the the Rothschild...

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

However, 'they' are going to blow the lid. In times of crisis, money matters little. What really matters if your community connections, preparedness, and 'physical' assets (especially food).

Take care my friends!

 

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